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  • Los Angeles, California – Great Place to Work and FORTUNE have honored Sheridan In-Home Care as one of the 2019 Best Workplaces for Aging Services. The ranking considered feedback representing 223,183 employees working for Great Place to Work-Certified organizations in Senior
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  • Los Angeles, California – Great Place to Work Institute has honored Sheridan Care with certification as a Great Place to Work. The certification process considered all caregiver and office employee surveys from both Sheridan Care locations. Great Place to Work, an
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  •   Meet Michael - Caregiver of the month for November 2018 - From Family Caregiver to Home Care Aide Working as a Home Care Aide is not always the first career choice for many individuals. Sometimes life takes you on a path
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  • Meet Grace - Caregiver of the month for August 2018  Grace has worked for Sheridan Care since March 2009. She is an exceptional caregiver who is ready to go above and beyond for her clients. She started her caregiver career with
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  • Caregiver = personal attendant, personal care aide, home care aide, home care attendant, in-home care aide. The official term for caregiver is a Home Care Aide (HCA) Home Care Agency/Organization: An agency that arranges for non-medical in-home care services such as
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News

Serving and Portion Sizes: How Much Should I Eat?

Eating a variety of foods from each food group will help you get the nutrients you need.

The Dietary Guidelines suggests that people 50 or older choose foods every day from the following:

cups

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Fruits—1½ to 2½ cups
  • Vegetables—2 to 3½ cups
  • Grains—5 to 10 ounces
  • Protein foods—5 to 7 ounces
  • Dairy foods—3 cups of fat-free or low-fat milk
  • Oils—5 to 8 teaspoons
  • Solid fats and added sugars (SoFAS) and sodium (salt)—keep the amount of SoFAS and sodium small

Does this mean you have to measure or weigh everything you eat? Not really. Some people find it helps to measure things carefully at first, but once you get used to your new eating plan, strict measuring probably won’t be necessary. But, what exactly is a serving? And is that different from a portion?

The word "serving" can have different meanings depending on how it is used. A Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Plan serving is how much of each food you should eat to meet the plan’s daily recommendation. (Learn more about serving sizes on the Nutrition Facts label .)

The term "portion" means how much of a single food is actually on your dish—a portion size can vary from meal to meal. For example, one restaurant might serve larger portions than another.

Here are some pictures to help you understand about how much you are eating:

portions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TIP: SNACKING

Snacks are okay, as long as they are smart food choices. If you want an afternoon pick-me-up or after-dinner snack, have a piece of fruit, or spread peanut butter or low-fat cream cheese on whole wheat toast. Don’t forget to include snacks in your daily food count. For example, one tablespoon of peanut butter spread on a slice of whole wheat toast counts toward the grains group and the protein foods group. Some ideas for healthy snacking include:

  • Have an ounce of cheese with some whole-grain crackers, a container of low-fat or fat-free yogurt, or some low-fat popcorn.
  • Put fruit instead of candy in the bowl on your coffee table.
  • Keep a container of cleaned, raw vegetables in the fridge.
  • If you want some chips or nuts, don’t eat from the bag. Count out a serving and put the bag away.

 

 

Original article:

https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/serving-and-portion-sizes-how-much-should-i-eat

 

Important breakthrough in the Alzheimer’s research – Scientists erase Alzheimer-causing gene in human brain

Alzheimers research

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Important breakthrough in the Alzheimer’s research – Scientists erase Alzheimer-causing gene in human brain

Last week brought important news from Californian Scientists. They were able to successfully change a protein associated with Alzheimer’s disease into a more harmless form. This breakthrough is an extremely important stepping-stone towards finding a cure for the disease.

This is the first time the researchers were able to use human cells instead of animals. This is significant as some treatments that have worked with mice have not worked with humans.

“The finding that the breakdown of the ApoE4 protein is associated with Alzheimer’s also provides insight into why treatments that work with mice may fail with humans. Amyloid-β production is not affected by the ApoE4 gene in mice. Treatments that have been shown to be effective with mice may not be as successful with humans because the mouse models don’t address ApoE4-related forms of Alzheimer’s in humans.” Read the whole Forbes article: This Gene May Explain Why Alzheimer's Treatments Succeed With Mice But Fail With Humans.

Facts & Figures

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, every 65 seconds someone in the United States develops the disease. At the moment, 5.7 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s.

quick facts Alzheimers

7 Inspirational Ways to Embrace Aging

Aging brings with it good and bad, but putting the spotlight on the good can help us shift our thinking. Instead of feeling that the best years are behind us, we can enjoy where we’re at and look forward to where we’re still meant to go.

Changing Our Perspective to Embrace Aging

How do we embrace aging instead of fear it? It takes perspective.

Consider these ways to feel inspired about the years to come:

1. Create.

Activities or projects that allow us to express ourselves provide a sense of self-fulfillment and release. Whether it’s building something, painting, writing or working on another creative project, it should be a practice that challenges us and one that we enjoy.

2. Create bonds.

Being close to at least one special person or staying in touch with family and friends can help us feel that we matter for what’s on the inside instead of the outside. Having that sense of support lifts us in times of struggle, making us feel loved and at peace.

3. Make an impact.

If it means something to you, it’s a cause worthy of your support, whether that be animals, children, the environment or another cause. Making a difference to someone or something gives us a sense of purpose and inspires us to do more.

4. Respect your body.

Accepting our “imperfections” helps us become more open to enjoying what our bodies can do instead of what they can’t. It’s also important to stay healthy, meaning we should keep up with doctor visits, have ourselves screened for illnesses as recommended and keep an eye on changes to our bodies that could impact our wellness.

5. Share stories.

It’s important to take pride in our experiences and share with others our distinct perspective and skills. Passing down traditions can become a lost art as families spread across the country. Seeing value in what you’ve done and what you know can help build a legacy.

6. Stay physically active.

Exercise helps us maintain balance and flexibility, which prevents falls and allows us to keep up with everyday activities. Plus, we’re more prone to illness as we age. Healthy aging provides a better quality of life.

7. Stay socially active.

Commit to regular social activities. Coffee gatherings, community groups, walks with friends – really, whatever interests you – is worth the commitment. It also helps motivate you and adds structure to your day.

It’s easy to fear aging, but embracing it is the clearest path to making the most of the years that lie ahead.

For original post at a Place for Mom: https://www.aplaceformom.com/blog/3-5-14-how-to-embrace-aging/

 

Summer is arriving – stay hydrated and keep our precious environment on your mind!

The risk of dehydration increases the older we get. According to the Nutrien Reference Values, men should drink about 10 cups and women 8 cups per day depending on their weight. On a hot day, you lose fluids more than normally, especially if you are taking medication. Remember to drink water regularly and always keep some next to you during the summer heat.

ecological

Sheridan Care is preparing for the hot summer season with a new water refill station Flowater. From an ecological point of view, this is a significant investment. Did you know that 79% of 6.9 billion tons of plastic waste ends in Landfills, floating in the oceans or piling up on city streets? Plastic is one of the major environmental issues we have now influencing our health, natural ecosystems, and the climate. Therefore, we use reusable water bottles with our new water refill system. We were able to save 100 bottles from the Landfill in only a few days just our office alone.

Keep yourself hydrated and remember to pay attention to your ecological footprint. You are always welcome to stop by our office to say hi and refill your bottle.

Sources:

http://www.abc.net.au/news/health/2017-10-18/how-much-water-do-we-need-to-drink-a-day/8996668

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/19/climate/plastic-pollution-study-science-advances.html

Mediterranean style diet may prevent dementia

Meals from the sunny Mediterranean have been linked to stronger bones, a healthier heart and longer life, along with a reduced risk for diabetes and high blood pressure. Now you can add lowering your risk for dementia to the ever growing list of reasons to follow the Mediterranean diet or one of its dietary cousins. New research being presented at the Alzheimer's Association International conference in London this week found healthy older adults who followed the Mediterranean or the similar MIND diet lowered their risk of dementia by a third.

"Eating a healthy plant-based diet is associated with better cognitive function and around 30% to 35% lower risk of cognitive impairment during aging," said lead author Claire McEvoy, of the University of California, San Francisco's School of Medicine. McEvoy stressed that because the study was conducted in a nationally representative older population "the findings are relevant to the general public."
close dialog
 
"While 35% is a greater than expected decrease for a lifestyle choice, I am not surprised," said Rudolph Tanzi, who directs the Genetics and Aging Research Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital and recently co-authored a book with Deepak Chopra on genes and aging called "Super Genes." "The activity of our genes is highly dependent on four main factors: diet, exercise, sleep and stress management," said Tanzi, who was not involved in the study. "Of these, perhaps diet is most important."
McEvoy's study investigated at the eating habits of nearly 6,000 older Americans with an average age of 68. After adjusting for age, gender, race, low educational attainment and lifestyle and health issues -- such as obesity, hypertension, diabetes, depression, smoking and physical inactivity -- researchers found that those who followed the MIND or Mediterranean diet had a 30% to 35% lower risk of cognitive impairment.
The more people stayed on those diets, said McEvoy, the better they functioned cognitively.
Those who marginally followed the diet also benefited, but by a much smaller margin. They were 18% less likely to exhibit signs of cognitive impairment.

What are the Mediterranean and MIND diets?

Forget lasagne, pizza, spanakopita and lamb souvlaki -- they are not on the daily menu of those who live by the sunny Mediterranean seaside.
The true diet is simple, plant-based cooking, with the majority of each meal focused on fruits and vegetables, whole grains, beans and seeds, with a few nuts and a heavy emphasis on extra virgin olive oil. Say goodbye to refined sugar or flour and fats other than olive oil, such as butter, are consumed rarely, if at all. Meat can make a rare appearance, but usually only to flavor a dish. Instead, meals may include eggs, dairy and poultry, but in much smaller portions than in the traditional Western diet. Fish, however, are a staple. The MIND diet takes the best brain foods of the Mediterranean diet and the famous salt-reducing DASH diet, and puts them together. MIND encourages a focus on eating from 10 healthy food groups while rejecting foods from five unhealthy groups. MIND stands for Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay, with DASH standing for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension. MIND was developed by Martha Clare Morris, a nutritional epidemiologist at Chicago's Rush University Medical Center in the US.
 
Those who follow MIND reject butter and stick margarine, red meats, cheeses, fried or fast food and sweets. Instead, they eat at least six servings a week of green leafy vegetables such as spinach or kale, and at least one serving a day of another vegetable. Three servings a day of whole grains are a must. They also add in at least three servings of beans, two or more servings of berries, two servings of chicken or turkey, and once serving of fish each week. Olive oil is their main cooking ingredient, and they drink a glass of wine a day. Morris has some powerful stats behind her diet.
In 2015, she studied 923 Chicago-area seniors and found those who say they followed the diet religiously had a 53% lower chance of getting Alzheimer's, while those who followed it moderately lowered their risk by about 35%. Follow-up observational studies showed similar benefits. Morris and her colleagues are currently recruiting volunteers for a three-year clinical study to try to prove the link.

Additional evidence

A second study presented at the conference also examined the impact of the MIND diet. Researchers from Wake Forest School of Medicine followed 7,057 women, average age 71, over almost 10 years and found those who most closely followed the MIND diet had a 34% reduction in the risk of developing Alzheimer's.
 
A third study at the conference looked at the dietary habits of 2,223 dementia-free Swedish adults over six years who followed the Nordic Prudent Dietary Pattern (NPDP) diet, which avoids sweets and fatty and processed foods. Instead, the diet emphasizes eating non-root vegetables, apple/pears/peaches, pasta/rice, poultry, fish, vegetable oils, tea and water, and light to moderate wine intake.
Swedes who stuck to the diet at a moderate or higher level preserved their cognitive function better than those who ate more processed and fatty foods.
Lastly, a fourth study examined MRI brain scans of 330 cognitively normal adults, with an average age of 79, and found eating foods that raise inflammation in the body -- such as sweets, processed foods and fried and fatty foods -- raised the risk for a shrinking "aging" brain and lower cognitive function. That comes as no surprise to neurologist Rudy Tanzi. "Foods that keep blood pressure normal, provide us with antioxidants, and maintain healthy bacteria in our gut, or microbiome, will serve to help keep chronic inflammation in check in the brain and entire body," said Tanzi. Despite the similarities of the results, experts point out that all of this research is observational, meaning that it is based on reports by individuals as to what they eat. To prove the connection between diet and dementia risk, said McEvoy, researchers will need to move to scientifically controlled experiments.
"I think the studies, taken together, suggest a role for high quality dietary patterns in brain health and for protection against cognitive decline during aging," said McEvoy. "Diet is modifiable, and in light of these studies we need clinical trials to test whether changing diet can improve or maintain cognition."
 
Until that definite proof is available, say experts, there's no harm in using this information to makes changes in your diet and lifestyle that could help protect your brain.
"Although the idea that a healthy diet can help protect against cognitive decline as we age is not new, the size and length of these four studies demonstrate how powerful good dietary practices may be in maintaining brain health and function," said Keith Fargo, Alzheimer's Association Director of Scientific Programs and Outreach. Tanzi agrees. "It's about time we started placing a greater emphasis on what we eat as we strive to have our 'healthspan' keep up with our increasing 'lifespan'."
 
For original Post by Sandee LaMotte at CNN:
 

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